Jun 1, 2007

You can't make this stuff up


Jack Kevorkian, the infamous best friend of many suicidal human beings, is being released from jail after serving an 8 year sentence for assisting assumed terminally ill patients die with dignity. But many of those people who died were not terminally ill. Thus enters more ethical debates on euthanasia practices.

In the AP Press Release, Jack is said to have promised to never help another person in an assisted suicide. Interesting promise. I can't recall having made such a promise in my lifetime, but maybe we should all start signing such waivers when we pass a certain age. What is the age limit at which time you become responsible for Knowing Better than to help someone kill themselves?

It is good to know, however, that Dr. Death (as he is known to close friends and family) is looking forward to the normal things in life. As one friend who is close to him revealed, he is planning on partaking of grapes...apricots...pistachios. He loves pistachios.

Awww. Dr. Death! You are so cute and personable, aren't you? You know, even crazed maniacal death assisters aren't so bad. In fact, after seeing this in the news article I decided I would dig a little deeper to find The Person Behind Dr. Death. Someone I'd like to call "Jacky".
This is Jacky on the cover of his jazz album. Did you know he was a jazz flautist? Just like this guy... In fact, not only is he a talented flautist but an artist in general.

He has painted many oil paintings. One of these paintings even ended up on an album cover from that popular band, Acid Bath.

Pretty. I like it Jacky. You are so quirky.

I think the event in his lifetime that probably has proven most frustrating is his failed investement. He quit his job and invested his LIFE SAVINGS into a project to produce and direct a film based on Handel's Messiah. He was unable to find anybody willing to distribute the film, thus losing everything.

Maybe thats what pushed him over the edge. Maybe it was the loss of his favorite Handel score and dreams of breaking into the Biz that allowed him to look past the moral implications of assisting suicides. I can't say. But what I will say is that I'm buying his jazz CD as soon as I can scrape together some cash.